A Wine Drinker's Guide to Whiter Teeth

Health

Winter is coming. And so are the holiday parties.

Here's how you can keep your teeth bright and still drink all the wine 

That delicious nectar of the gods you’ll be drinking all around town turns your mouth purple and it's not just weird (we like weird,) it’s damaging.

Think you’re safe because you only drink white? Nope. That’s even worse.

The acidity in your favorite adult beverage is so high that it actually softens enamel (science) and white wine is more acidic than red meaning that glass of white will lead even more stains your teeth in the long run. 

But fear not. We would never tell you to lay of the sauce (how else are you going to get through your office holiday party?) but we will tell you to lay off the tube, as in your commercial toothpaste tube. 

With your enamel already softened by acid-ridden wine, it's important to brush your teeth with tooth power or (ahem) Bits or any product that does not contain hydrated silica.

Hydrated silica is a cheap abrasive thats used in most mainstream toothpastes but on standard levels of hardness (Moh's Hardness Scale) it's a 7 and healthy tooth enamel is a 5. Remember that wine-weakened enamel we talked about, this means you are literally scratching the delicate outer layer of your teeth every time you use a silica-based commercial toothpaste - not awesome. 

The good news is some natural tooth powders and toothpaste alternatives (like our Bits!) do not contain hydrated silica or other enamel-damaging ingredients 

Here are 4 more things you can do to keep your teeth bright and still drink all the wine 

  • No red after white. This is the double-trouble duo. White wine weakens enamel helping red wine stains set deeper. 
  • Swish water around your mouth before and after drinking red or white to rinse away leftover wine.
  • Nosh while you sip. Hard cheeses and high fiber foods like spinach amp up saliva which gets to work protecting teeth and whisking tannins away.
  • Brush before you drink to get rid of the plaque that tannins love to stick to resulting in those eggplant-hued teeth. 

 Cheers to your holidays being merry and your pearly whites staying bright! 


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